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Destinations

NAMIBIA

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Destinations

NAMIBIA

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Destinations

NAMIBIA

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Destinations

NAMIBIA

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Destinations

NAMIBIA

Namibia's wide open spaces and immense vaulted skies yield vistas and perspectives quite unlike anywhere else, and a safari here offers all the highlights - but with its own entirely unique twist.

Namibia is an enigma of extreme landscapes whose seductive beauty is an open invitation to discover. Infinite rolling sand dunes dotted with long-shadowed creatures, raging waves smashing the Skeleton Coast, and ancient sacred sites hidden in desert caves Drift above in a hot air balloon, dip and swoop in a plane, or sign up for a self-drive safari and roam and ramble where you please.

Best time to traval: Namibia is at its best in March, April and May - and again in September and October.

Desert Wildlife

Far from being a wasteland, the desert hosts its own remarkable array of fauna and flora that have adapted to flourish under its exacting conditions. The sight of a black rhino is rendered more striking by the ascetic severity of its surrounds, and the same goes for spotting an elephant or oryx as they cast long shadows, picking their way over red dunes. Part of Namibia's intrigue is the paradox that lies in its simultaneous harshness and bounty.

Brandberg Rock Art

Helicopter up to the highest part of Namibia: an ancient volcanic core heaped with enormous basaltic boulders, giving way to caves that are sacred spiritual sites of the San Bushmen. With over 1,000 grottos containing some 45,000 rock paintings, this special spot proffers endless hours of fascination. The Brandberg - meaning fire mountain - rises out of flat gravel plains, and yields up breath-taking vistas over miles and miles of empty desert.

Swakopmund Oysters

Swakopmund was founded in 1892 by German colonisers, in the midst of the desert where the scenic Swakop River meets the sea. Only independent in 1990, its layers of colonial past and beautiful German architecture make for bear testament to Namibia's rich history. A wooden jetty dating back to 1905 hosts a superb restaurant serving seafood, sushi and the best oysters in town.

The Skeleton Coast

The Skeleton Coast is plagued by thick oceanic fog, and its sandy shore gives way to rocky outcrops and relentless pounding surf, all of which have conspired to shipwreck a number of vessels over time. The Namibian Bushmen refer to this part of their country as 'The Land God Made in Anger', and for the marooned sailors who made it onto shore, the fate of the scathing arid desert that awaited them would probably have made the raging sea seem preferable.

Flying with the Schoeman Brothers

The Schoeman family has been operating trips along the Skeleton Coast for over two decades, swooping their guests between far-flung beaches and private airstrips in small aeroplanes. Their intimacy with this part of the world is unparalleled, and as each trip is guided by one of the four brothers, the experience is guaranteed to be educational and enlightening, as well as great fun. As you hop between locations, sleep out in tents and tiny camps, and dine under the stars.

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Ballooning over Sossusvlei

There can hardly be a more spectacular way to take in the sunrise than from the silent drift of a hot air balloon floating over the Namib's unfathomably immense sand dunes. The sun slowly lights the undulating red sands, bringing you to touchdown, where you will toast the day with a sumptuous champagne breakfast in the world's oldest desert, and arguably one of the most scenic spots on the planet.